How To Work From Home No Scams – Please!

How To Work From Home No Scams – Please!

There’s a daunting array of online work from home opportunities to choose from, and so often I see in online forums or community boards – attention grabbing headlines like How To Work From Home No Scams, that my BS radar is on full alert from those offers that seem too good to be true.

So how do you sniff out the scam offers over those that are legitimate? Given that the internet and online search-ability is fueled by written content and lots of it; unfortunately writers are particularly at risk of being targeted for every pseudo award, training program and get rich scheme out there.

It IS possible to make money online without being caught up in a scam.

There are PLENTY Of Legitimate Work From Home Opportunities Ideal For Writers

  • The Remote Office – for staff & employees
  • Freelance Writing – blogs / technical articles
  • The home office – virtual assistant / receptionist
  • Business Writing – Develop Training Manuals, business plans, power point
  • Marketing & Brand – Brochure content, Flyers, e-newsletters
  • Social Media Marketing / Administrator / Creator
  • Resume Writing
  • Translating Services
  • Web Developer / Designer
  • Produce e-books & work on your next novel!

You Can’t Beat Real Life Conversations

If you have well developed networks in real life (IRL), you can’t go beat face to face conversations to drum up a bit of extra work!

I know a large number of people who have leveraged their existing connections to get a steady stream of ‘mini projects’ that they can work on from home. Work from home projects are great, particularly if you’re juggling other work, kids or personal commitments.

I used to work for a large corporate and we often outsourced content writing, particularly development of training material to a couple of contractors and this worked really well. It was very cost effective for the company as each project had a start and end point with a fixed objective, so a contractor was great for this type of thing. In New Zealand, projects from writers can be paid at a pre-agreed fixed amount for completion, or be based on an hourly rate – in my experience rates can be anywhere from from $35-$150 per hour, depending on the topic, level of technical writing involved and skill set of the contractor.

The Remote Office

More and more companies these days are moving to the remote office concept. This is where employees (part & full time) are equipped with all the portable tools to get their job done, and they have the flexibility of working in the office, or from their home or other location. Again, I’ve seen this work very well for both employee and employer; having the flexibility to work one or more days from home can create a huge amount of loyalty to the company, so it’s a win win for both. As a former people manager, the flexibility to work from home was critical. My work from home days were the interruption free hours when I caught up on my work; and my office days were invariably crammed full of meetings and being available for my team.

Tell Tale Signs Of Writing Job Scams

  1. If it sounds too good to be true – it is!
  2. You are approached directly, by an organisation you’ve never heard of – ‘We are looking for writers…’ Publishing houses, magazines and any established brand worth their salt will have writers lining up to work with them; it is highly unlikely that they will be out randomly tapping aspiring writers on the shoulder
  3. You’re asked to pay a joining fee up front, before you are paid. Beware – it’s likely to be a SCAM
  4. Double check the domain name and URL address that the offer has been made from. It’s not uncommon to see an offer from a well known company only to find there’s deception involved
  5. The same applies to unsolicited emails. If I receive any odd looking email in my inbox, I always have a very close look at the email address it’s coming from. 95% of the time, it’s a scam.
  6. Competitions, Awards, Diplomas, Directories all need to be investigated very carefully and verified for their legitimacy
  7. Lack of verifiable contact details on the website the offer has come from

Google is your friend – Do your homework and check your facts before accepting any online writing opportunity.

I’d love to add to this list of tell tale warning signs, so please use the comments below to suggest further ideas for this list. Let’s increase awareness and keep the internet safe for our writing community. Hope to hear from you soon, Karen

8 Responses so far.

  1. Hi Kdforsman,
    I’m on WA, and I read your post today. Love the article. Very thorough. I ran across a site the other day recommenced by someone on WA. It’s http://www.textbroker.com. According to the WA member, it is legit and pays for writing content which they ask for. Don’t know if it is a site you could use for an article later.
    Check out my site at habitshurts.com if you don’t mind!

    • admin says:

      Thanks Howard, I’ll definitely check textbroker.com out and write a review on it here. Appreciate the heads up 🙂 Anyway, thanks for the feedback, I’ll definitely check out your website, I’m already intrigued! All the best, Karen

  2. Simon says:

    Hey Karen, sniffing out a legitimate online business that generates a good income & doesn’t confine you to a considerable amount of work is something I failed to come across.

    I like your idea of leveraging existing connections to accomplish a steady stream of ‘mini projects’ that can be worked from home, great idea however your first warning of identifying a typical scam is generally the case – if it sounds too good to be true, it usually is.
    The internet’s littered with opportunities promoting fabulous lifestyles, it’s one heck of a scammy environment.

    Instead, I opted to create my own affiliate marketing business, building a website around my interest however this is no get rich quick scheme, it takes time to attract visitors to accomplish conversions and does require full time work to achieve & maintain high Search Engine rankings but it is legit and that’s the main thing for me. Wealthy Affiliate taught me the ropes.
    All the best,
    Simon.

    • KD Forsman says:

      Hi Simon, you are right, I don’t think there is a get rich quick option – or at least none that I’m aware of! Building a successful online business takes time, and effort. That’s why so many people fail, they are not prepared for the amount of effort or they have been mislead by false claims that it’s easy. It’s not. I’d much rather be in the 5% who succeed and build a sustainable business, than the others that fall by the wayside. The trick is to have a proven template to follow – as this can save a lot of wasted time going around in circles achieving not much. Wealth Affiliate as you mention, does just that. Thanks for sharing your story. Cheers, Karen

  3. Your advices on avoiding scam is very helpful, especially when it comes to online writing opportunities. You have the legitimate one and those just want to steal people skills and money. It is very important to be extra careful checking out each online writing offer. Very informative post.

    • KD Forsman says:

      Hi there, you are absolutely correct. It pays to do your homework and make sure that you are entering into a legitimate partnership – especially if you are providing a service and are expecting to be paid! Proceed with caution and a healthy dose of skepticism. Best wishes, Karen

  4. Matts Mom says:

    Great information! I especially liked the tips on spotting a writing scam. Some of them I had really not thought of. I also didn’t know that you can really make decent money doing this! I am glad I found this!

    • KD Forsman says:

      Hi there, Thanks for dropping by and I’m glad you found this article of interest. If you are interested in pursuing a blogging or affiliate marketing business online, then please check out my number one recommendation here. All the best with your travel adventures. Cheers, Karen

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